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What we do

The Centre seeks to identify practical ways to increase productivity and enhance shared prosperity. Our research programme covers four broad and interlinking areas, each of which assumes a national and local lens:

Trade and Competitiveness

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Sustainable Public Finances

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Strategic Economic Infrastructure

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Public Services, Welfare and Skills

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How we work

To maximise the impact of our work on the ground, the Centre brings together a focus on:

  • High quality analysis to develop policy recommendations fully, identifying through robust quantitative and qualitative research key barriers to system change;
  • Engagement and advocacy, co-designing research programmes with policymakers to develop pragmatic solutions and maximise the real world value of our work; and,
  • Implementation, working with stakeholders – including national and local government, business and civil society – to navigate technical, political and institutional complexity to achieve outcomes.

Latest Research

Blog: The World Cup brings us together, shouldn’t economic policies do the same?

Inclusive growth, and the ideas and concepts emerging from it, represent a fundamental reassessment of our economic principles, priorities and assumptions – and a response to that disaffection. At the heart of it is one big idea: it isn’t enough to welcome the rate, or quantity of economic growth. We also have to consider its quality.

Book: Work in the Digital Age Challenges of the Fourth Industrial Revolution

Drawing on a wide range of international expertise, contributors examine important policy challenges arising from the transformation of work as a result of the introduction of digital technology at work.

Working Paper: Don’t shoot the messenger – Why mergers and acquisitions highlight, not cause, the UK’s economic issues

Despite the political noise, John Dudding from the Centre for Progressive Policy argues that the economic case for a public interest test for takeovers doesn’t stack up