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What we do

The Centre seeks to identify practical ways to increase productivity and enhance shared prosperity. Our research programme covers four broad and interlinking areas, each of which assumes a national and local lens:

Trade and Competitiveness

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Sustainable Public Finances

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Strategic Economic Infrastructure

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Public Services, Welfare and Skills

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How we work

To maximise the impact of our work on the ground, the Centre brings together a focus on:

  • High quality analysis to develop policy recommendations fully, identifying through robust quantitative and qualitative research key barriers to system change;
  • Engagement and advocacy, co-designing research programmes with policymakers to develop pragmatic solutions and maximise the real world value of our work; and,
  • Implementation, working with stakeholders – including national and local government, business and civil society – to navigate technical, political and institutional complexity to achieve outcomes.

Latest Research

Blog: HE has a HESA – why can’t FE have a FESA?

A “data deficit” is responsible for the persistent failure of UK skills policy, explains our analyst Andy Norman who questions the absence of an FE statistics agency.

Op-ed: Reforming the land market can help deliver 300,000 homes per year

The government’s new housebuilding target of 300,000 net additional homes per year for England will require new build completions to rise from around 184,000 to somewhere close to 280,000 units a year. To achieve this, the government needs to tackle three key issues related to the current dysfunctional land market. Firstly, the requirement to bid […]

Reforming the land market: How land reform can help deliver the government target of 300,000 new homes per year

A new analysis from the Centre for Progressive Policy shows that the government can reach its target of 300,000 additional homes by reforming the land market.